Энциклопедия Формулы 1:
1950-2019

Rambler's Top100

Италия
Италия

Луиджи Фаджиоли

Fagioli, Luigi

Луиджи Фаджиоли / Fagioli, Luigi

(c) 'Who is Who' by Steve Small, 2000

Родился:

09.06.1898

Озимо, Анкона

Умер:

20.06.1952

Монте-Карло, Монако

Сезонов в Ф1:

2

Лет в Ф1:

2

Гран При:

7

Старты:

7

Победы:

1

- подряд:

Подиумы:

6

- подряд:

4

Поул-позиции:

- подряд:

Первый ряд:

4

- подряд:

3

Быстрые круги:

- подряд:

Лучший финиш:

1

Лучший старт:

2

Дубли:

Хет-трики:

Лидирование старт/финиш:

Большие шлемы:

Круги:

351

- лидирования:

8

Километры:

2598.48

- лидирования:

49.3

Очки:

32

- за один сезон:

28

- подряд:

4

Ф1: 1950-1951

Луиджи Фаджиоли / Fagioli, Luigi - 1950-1951

Год

Команда

Шасси

1950SA Alfa RomeoAlfa Romeo 158
Alfa Romeo 158
1951SA Alfa RomeoAlfa Romeo 159
Alfa Romeo 159

'The old Abruzzi robber', as he became affectionately known, Fagioli was one of Italy's greatest drivers and a true individualist who often found himself at odds with those in authority. His career started in 1926, but he really shot to fame upon joining the Maserati team in 1930. Over the next three seasons he won occasionally but was often out of luck, which prompted him to join Ferrari's Alfa Romeo team in the second half of the 1933 season. Soon he had won the GPs of Pescara, Comminges, Marseilles and Italy, which brought an invitation to drive for Mercedes-Benz as number two driver in 1934.

In his first race, the Eifelrennen, irked at being told to stay behind the sister entry of von Brauchitsch, Fagioli showed his displeasure by parking his car out on the circuit and returning to the pits on foot. It was not to be the last time he would find himself in conflict with the team, but that did not stop him winning the Italian and Spanish GPs that year, and those at Monaco, AVUS and Barcelona the following season. He continued with the team for 1936 before moving to their great rivals Auto Union, but was forced to miss much of the season through illness, although he was fifth at Tripoli.

In fact Fagioli did not return to the Grand Prix arena until 1950, with the all-conquering Alfa Romeo team. His experience stood him in good stead and some cold and calculating performances brought him third place in the World Championship. He was retained for 1951 but at the French GP he was hauled from the car at a pit stop as he recovered from an early spin to allow Fangio to take over and complete the race, the Argentinian going on to win. This was the last straw for the proud Fagioli, and he never raced a GP car again.

Turning to his own OSCA, he won his class in the Mille Miglia, a feat which he repeated in 1952 at the wheel of a Lancia Aurelia tourer. More remarkable was the fact that he was third overall ahead of many pure sports racers. That year the Monaco GP was held for sports cars only, and during practice Fagioli lost control of his car in the tunnel and broadsided out into a stone balustrade. Thrown out, he was taken to hospital unconscious, with a broken arm and leg. Four days later he regained consciousness and seemed to be out of danger, but three weeks after the crash he relapsed - with a complete failure of the nervous system - and died, aged 54.

(c) 'Who is Who' by Steve Small, 2000

© WildSoft, 1995-2019